C1 Business Higher

Exam format

C1 Business Higher is made up of four papers developed to test your English skills. You can see exactly what is in each paper below.

Paper

Content

Marks (% of total)

Purpose

Reading
(1 hour)
See sample paper

6 parts

25%

Shows you can deal confidently with different types of text.

Writing
(1 hour and 10 minutes)
See sample paper

2 parts

25%

You need to be able to write a variety of different items such as memos, letters, emails, reports and proposals.

Listening
(about 40 minutes, including transfer time)
See sample paper

3 parts

25%

You need to be able to follow and understand a range of spoken materials, such as presentations, interviews and discussions.

Speaking
(16 minutes per pair of candidates)
See sample paper

3 parts

25%

Tests your ability to communicate effectively in face-to-face situations. Your Speaking test will be face-to-face with one or two other candidates. This makes your test more realistic and more reliable.

What’s in the Reading paper?

The C1 Business Higher Reading paper has six parts with different types of texts and questions. For each part, you have to read one long text or two or more shorter, related texts.

Summary

Time allowed:

1 hour

Number of parts:

6

Number of questions:

52

Marks:

25% of total

Length of texts:

150–600 words per text.

Part 1 (Matching)

What's in Part 1?

Either a single text which is divided into sections or five short, related texts and a series of statements. You have to match each statement to the section or text where you can find the information.

What do I have to practise?

Reading for gist and global meaning.

How many questions are there?

8

How many marks are there?

One mark for each correct answer.

Part 2 (Matching)

What's in Part 2?

A text with six numbered gaps, each of which represents a missing sentence, followed by some sentences (A–H). You have to read the text and the sentences and decide which sentence best fits each gap.

What do I have to practise?

Understanding structure and reading for detail.

How many questions are there?

6

How many marks are there?

One mark for each correct answer. 

Part 3 (Multiple choice)

What's in Part 3?

A text followed by some multiple-choice questions. These may be either whole questions or incomplete sentences. For each one, there are four options and you have to choose A, B, C or D.

What do I have to practise?

Understanding general points and specific details.

How many questions are there?

6

How many marks are there?

One mark for each correct answer.

Part 4 (Multiple-choice cloze)

What's in Part 4?

A text with some numbered gaps, each of which represents a missing word. You have to choose the right word for each gap from four options (A, B, C or D).

What do I have to practise?

Reading – vocabulary and structure.

How many questions are there?

10 

How many marks are there?

One mark for each correct answer.

Part 5 (Open cloze)

What's in Part 5?

A text with some numbered gaps, each of which represents a missing word. You have to identify the right word for each gap.

What do I have to practise?

Reading – text structure and discourse features.

How many questions are there?

10 

How many marks are there?

One mark for each correct answer.

Part 6 (Proofreading)

What's in Part 5?

A text in which some lines are correct and some lines have an extra, unnecessary word. If the line is correct, you write 'CORRECT' on your answer sheet. If the line is not correct, you have to write the extra word down.

What do I have to practise?

Reading – understanding sentence structure, error identification.

How many questions are there?

12

How many marks are there?

One mark for each correct answer.